• Safeguarding

    AT IPSWICH SPORTS CLUB

A Safe Place for All

The Club works alongside various sports governing bodies and local agencies/organisations in carrying out our activities and we are committed to provide a safe place for all to enjoy sports and fitness at Ipswich Sports Club.  

Here below you will find information including various policies and general information about safeguarding at the Club.

Club & General Welfare Information

Changing Room Policy

May 2019 MEMBER NOTICE Changing Room Policy Ipswich Sports Club is committed to prioritising the wellbeing of children and adults at risk promoting safeguarding in the Club at all times.

This Policy strives to minimise risk, deliver a positive attitude for everyone and respond appropriately to all safeguarding concerns/disclosures. Members/Parents/Children/Vulnerable Adults/Carers must be aware of the following:

  • When using the toilets and changing rooms, all children under the age of 10 years must be accompanied by an adult (parent/carer); they must not be left unattended at any time.
  • Children aged 9-18, depending on their gender, must use the appropriate male/female toilets and changing rooms. However, if any child wishes to use the toilets or changing rooms and does not wish to change in either the male/female toilets or changing rooms, they may use the Disabled Toilet which is clearly marked.
  • Due to the risks of inappropriate photography or filming, mobile phones or any other device must not be used for that purpose within the changing area. Filming and photography is strictly prohibited. Any concerns should be raised immediately with Club Staff or Club Safeguarding Officer(s).
  • Mobile phones should be used sensitively in these areas and with respect to other people using the facilities.
  • If children are uncomfortable changing or showering at the Club, no pressure should be placed on them to do so. Parents/carers should suggest instead that they may change and shower at home.
  • Vulnerable adults should be accompanied by a parent/carer when using the toilets or changing rooms. If anyone has any concerns with the above, please contact the Club General Manager or Club Safeguarding Officer(s).

Club Constitution

Constitution, Regulations and Standing Orders of Ipswich Sports Club (The Rules of the Constitution can only be changed at a Club general meeting. The Regulations and Standing Orders can be modified by Council as required and ratified by the Club at the next general meeting)

2 CONSTITUTION (as approved and adopted by Members at the Annual General Meeting held on Wednesday, 11 June 2014 and amended at an Extraordinary General Meeting held on 25 February 2016 and at Annual General Meetings held on 30 June 2016, 15 June 2017 and 27 June 2018 ) CONTENTS/RULES

1 Name

2 Main Purpose

3 Membership & Subscriptions

4 Governance

5 Trustees & Assets

6 Management

7 Sports and other Sections

8 Finance

9 Premises

10 Tennis only

11 Dissolution

12 Knowledge

13 Notices and Interpretation

1 NAME The name of the Club shall be Ipswich Sports Club.

2 MAIN PURPOSE The main purpose of the Club is to provide facilities for and to promote participation in the amateur sports of tennis, squash and racketball, hockey and such other eligible activities as the Club shall from time to time adopt in Ipswich and the surrounding areas. The Club shall promote the best interests of each activity consistent with the general interests of the Club and its members and maintaining the Club’s status as a Community Amateur Sports Club. The Club aims to develop and maintain a coaching infrastructure which encourages participation in sport by new members of all ages and helps existing members achieve their ambitions.

3 MEMBERSHIP & SUBSCRIPTIONS 3.1 Membership of the Club shall be open to anyone interested in sport on application, regardless of sex, age, disability, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, religion or other beliefs, except as a necessary consequence of the requirements of a particular sport. The Club may have different classes of membership and subscription on a non-discriminatory and fair basis. The Club will keep subscriptions at levels that will not pose a significant obstacle to people participating. The Club Council may refuse membership, or remove it, only for good cause as conduct or character likely to bring the club or sport into disrepute. New members shall be admitted to membership of the Club upon completion of a membership application form unless to do so would be regarded as contrary to the best interests of the Club’s sports and other activities or the good conduct and interests of the Club and subject to payment of the relevant membership subscription tariff. Membership categories comprise Playing Members (ie Adult Members, Junior Members, Temporary Members, Life Members, Honorary Members), Social Members and such other category or categories of membership as the Council may decide from time to time. 3.2 The Council may elect Honorary Members on such terms and conditions as it may from time to time decide. 3.3 The Council shall have power to limit the number of members of the Club. 3 3.4 All playing members shall, upon payment of the relevant membership subscription and any applicable match or playing fees, be entitled, subject to these rules, to enjoy the sporting and other facilities, amenities and privileges of membership of the Club. After payment of any prescribed lump sum, Life Members shall not be required to pay the membership subscription. 3.5 The Council may also allow members to pay a reduced or nominal membership subscription in such special circumstances as the Council may determine. 3.6 Social Members are entitled to use the general social facilities, amenities and privileges of the Club but not the sporting facilities of the Club or participate in any sporting event promoted or organised by the Club without additional payment. 3.7 Junior Members are members who are under the age of 18 when their subscription is due. 3.8 Temporary Members may be admitted to the Club for a maximum period of 3 months (or such longer period as the Council may exceptionally agree) in any period of 12 months and may participate in all activities of the Club, subject to these rules. 3.9 Members may introduce bona fide guests to the Club premises. Members are responsible for the behaviour of their guests at all times. Guests may take part in sports at specified times on payment of the relevant guest fee which is payable in advance. 3.10 Use of the Clubhouse and amenities of the Club including the purchase or consumption of intoxicating liquor shall only be permitted for the following categories of visitor during the day of his or her visit only: 3.10.1 guests introduced by members in accordance with paragraph 3.9 3.10.2 guests introduced by members at social functions 3.10.3 members of a team visiting the Club for matches or other sporting activities 3.10.4 a visiting member of the LTA using the tennis facilities, or who has used the tennis facilities during the day of their visit. 3.11 Membership subscriptions shall be reviewed at least annually by the Council. The Council is empowered to cancel the membership of members whose membership subscription or any part thereof or any other match or playing fees are more than one month overdue. 3.12 Any member wishing to withdraw his or her membership must signify the same in writing to the Membership Administrator. Members ceasing to belong to the Club either by resignation or otherwise shall not be entitled to any of the benefits of membership or any refund of subscription, unless having paid an annual subscription on joining a member takes advantage of a 14 day cooling off period and gives due written notice when a full refund shall be given. 3.13 If the conduct of a member, whether on Club premises or otherwise, shall in the opinion of the Council be injurious to the character of the Club a majority of two-thirds of the Council actually present at a Council meeting shall be empowered at once to invite such member to resign within twenty eight days and suspend him or her from the use of the Club pending such resignation. If the member shall not resign within twenty eight days a special Council meeting consisting of not less than two thirds of Council members shall be convened to consider the question of expelling the member from the Club. The member proposed to be expelled shall be entitled to attend such meeting. After hearing any submission by such member the Council shall proceed by ballot to decide whether the member shall be expelled from the Club. If not less than two thirds of the Council members present vote in favour of expulsion, the member shall be considered expelled and shall be so informed by recorded delivery letter. A member resigning or being expelled in accordance with this rule shall be ineligible for readmission to the Club for a period of ten years except at the discretion and upon such terms as the Council may determine.

4 4 GOVERNANCE 4.1 The Annual General Meeting (AGM) is open to all members and must be held annually. 4.2 At least twenty eight day’s notice of all general meetings, specifying the date, place and time of the meeting and the business to be transacted shall be given. All general meetings shall be advertised on Club notice boards and web site and notice will be sent as provided for in rule 13 to every member entitled to receive such notice. Junior Members and Temporary Members shall not be entitled to receive notice of, nor vote, at general meetings. 4.3 The AGM of the Club shall be held at the Clubhouse not later than June 30 in each year for the following purposes: (i) to receive the Chairman’s report of the activities of the Club during the previous year (ii) to receive the Club’s financial statements for the preceding financial year (iii) to receive an explanation of the budget adopted by the Council for the current financial year and a mid term financial report (iv) to elect the President, the Officers of the Club (namely the Chairman, Vice Chairman, Secretary, and Treasurer) and other members of the Council (except chairmen of principal sports section committees), and to appoint the Auditors for the ensuing year (v) to consider any resolutions which may have been submitted to the Secretary in accordance with Rule 4.8 (vi) to deal with any other ordinary business acceptable to the Chairman of the meeting or put forward by the Council 4.4 The President of the Club shall be elected from the membership at the AGM each year and shall be an ex-officio member of the Council. Honorary Vice Presidents of the Club shall be elected at an AGM and will be entitled to full Club Membership. Honorary Vice Presidents are not required to submit themselves for re-election each year, nor to pay any membership subscription. 4.5 The Chairman, Vice Chairman, Secretary and Treasurer shall retire at each AGM and shall be eligible for re-election. Ordinary Council members must offer themselves for re-election after three years. All members of Council shall be eligible for re-election provided they have not served for the six previous years (provided that members, by simple majority, may with regard to the Chairman, Vice-Chairman, Secretary and Treasurer waive this limitation of six previous years if it is in the best interests of the Club at the time). Any members ineligible under this rule shall be eligible for election after one year. 4.6 The election of Officers and ordinary members of Council, other than chairmen of principal Sports or other Section Committees, shall take place at the AGM. Except in the case of retiring members, nominations duly proposed and seconded shall be sent to the Secretary in writing 21 days before the meeting. The nominations shall be posted in the Clubhouse not less than 14 days before the AGM. 4.7 In the event of insufficient nominations having been received in advance to fill all vacancies on the Council, nominations may be made at the AGM but only after the retiring members eligible for re-election and those nominated in accordance with rule 4.6 have been duly elected. 4.8 The Council may also convene an Extraordinary General Meeting (EGM) of the members at its discretion to consider urgent or important matters affecting the Club and shall be bound to do so on receiving a request signed by not less than 10% or 100 (whichever is the lower) of members entitled to vote (see rule 13). 5 4.9 Any Member wishing to place a resolution before a general meeting must give notice in writing to the Secretary at least 21 days before the date of the general meeting. A copy of such resolution shall be posted in the Clubhouse following receipt. 4.10 At all general meetings only members entitled to vote (as defined in rule 13.2) may vote. At an AGM 20 members entitled to vote and who are present shall form a quorum. At an EGM, 10% or 100 whichever is the lower of members entitled to vote shall form a quorum (unless the meeting has been called by the Council to consider either a matter under rule 8.4 or one or more resolutions in relation to the incorporation of the Club and/or it becoming a charitable body when 50 members entitled to vote and present shall form a quorum in respect of any such Council supported resolutions(s), but not otherwise). 4.11 General meetings shall be chaired by the President or, at his/her request, the Chairman or Vice Chairman of the Council or other Officer, them failing, any member of the Council present. In the absence of all these persons a member will be nominated by the meeting to take the chair. 4.12 These rules may be altered by resolution at a general meeting provided that the resolution shall not be passed unless a majority of least two thirds of members present and entitled to vote vote in favour. All other resolutions and proposals which require the decision of any general meeting shall be decided by a majority vote. Voting shall be by a show of hands unless a ballot is called for. Every member (except the chairman of the meeting) present and entitled to vote shall have one vote on every motion and in case of equality of votes the chairman of the meeting shall have a casting vote. Voting by proxy shall not be allowed. 4.13 The Council may on any given question decide to hold a postal referendum of the members of the Club entitled to vote at general meetings. The referendum shall be determined by reference to votes cast and returned to the Club within the period (not being less than a month) indicated in the referendum notice and the decision of the referendum shall be binding upon the Club provided that a majority from not less than one third of the members entitled to vote voted in favour. 4.13 The government of the Club between Annual General Meetings shall be vested in the Council. Any powers that are conferred on the Council by these rules may be delegated by the Council to such person or committee by such means, to such extent, in relation to such matters and on such terms and conditions as the Council thinks fit. The Council may revoke any delegation or alter its terms and conditions.

5 TRUSTEES and ASSETS 5.1 The Executive Committee (referred to in rule 6.5) shall be the Managing Trustees of the Club and authorised to manage the club and administer the assets of the Club in accordance with resolutions passed by the Council. 5.2 Any freehold or leasehold property of the Club may be used as security for loans to the Club upon such terms and conditions as the Managing Trustees shall decide. 5.3 The Managing Trustees shall have power to invest the assets of the Club in such investments as the Council shall from time to time think fit. Any assets which are only capable of being held in the name of one individual person may be held by such person upon such terms as the Managing Trustees shall agree. 5.4 The Club may appoint a Custodian Trustee for the purposes of holding assets of the Club. 5.5 The Club may, if the Council deems it desirable or necessary, establish a trading subsidiary of the club. The Executive Committee shall be the first directors of any trading subsidiary so established. 5.6 Any two Managing Trustees are authorised to execute any document on behalf of the Club 6 giving effect to transactions to which the Club is a party and binding the Club to such arrangements.

6 MANAGEMENT 6.1 The Council shall consist of the President, Chairman, Vice Chairman, Secretary, Treasurer, General Manager and one Section Chairman for each principal sport or other activity together with not more than two other members of the Club elected to the Council. Six members of the Council present shall form a quorum. The Council may from time to time fill any casual vacancies in its body by co-opting additional members in their place. Any member chosen to fill a vacancy on the Council shall retain office until the next AGM. 6.2 The Council shall be responsible for the management of the Club and shall appoint such committees and paid staff as may be necessary from time to time. 6.3 The Vice Chairman may deputise for the Chairman if he/she is unavailable to perform any normal Club duty. 6.4 The Council may appoint a General Manager who will be responsible for day to day operational management of the Club and implementation of the Council’s policy. 6.5 At its first meeting after the AGM the Council shall elect from its own members an Executive Committee to act on its behalf between Council Meetings. The Executive Committee shall consist of the Chairman, Vice Chairman, Secretary, Treasurer, General Manager and up to one other member of the Council. The Treasurer, and such other person/s as Council may nominate will form the Finance Committee. 6.6 The Council shall meet at least 4 times a year. 6.7 The Chairman, Vice Chairman, Secretary and Treasurer shall have the right but not the obligation to attend meetings of the principal Sports Section Committees referred to in rule 7 and any other committees established from time to time by the Council. 6.8 The Council may from time to time delegate authority to such committees. 6.9 The Chairmen of the sports or other Section Committees shall, subject to the approval of Council, be appointed from within these Sections in accordance with rule 7. 6.10 The Council may from time to time fill any casual vacancy in its body. Any member chosen to fill a vacancy on the Council shall retain office until the next AGM. 6.11 Minutes shall be taken of all proceedings of the Council or any Sports or other Section Committee as laid down from time to time by the Council. The minutes of the Council shall be open to inspection by any member and available for members to read save for any part which the Council has deemed ‘confidential’ and the minutes of any Sports or other Section Committee shall likewise be open to inspection or to be read by any member. 6.12 Between Council meetings, the day to day government of the Club will be vested in the Executive Committee on the understanding that ordinarily all matters of real significance affecting the Club will be referred to the Council for decision, or ratification if an urgent interim decision is called for. When considering any matter, any member of the Executive Committee can require that matter to be referred to a Council meeting for discussion and decision. 6.13 If an item arises for discussion or decision at any meeting of the Council, Executive Committe or Finance Committee in which any member has a financial conflict of interest that member shall immediately declare that interest and shall not take part in any decision or vote thereon. 6.14 The members of the Council, the Managing Trustees and the Custodian Trustees and/or individual Club Trustees appointed from time to time by or at the direction of the Club’s 7 Council in place of Custodian Trustees shall be entitled to an indemnity out of the assets of the Club for all expenses and other liabilities properly incurred by them acting as trustees for or in the management of the affairs of the Club (but only to the extent of its assets).

7 SPORTS AND OTHER SECTIONS Each sport or other activity of the Club, recognised by the Council, shall be entitled to elect its own Section Committee to manage its sports or other activity section. Such Section Committees shall adopt their own rules for the appointment of officers (including the appointment of a chairman) which must conform with the general rules of the Club and be approved by a resolution of the Council. Such rules will become appendices to the Club Rules. The appointment of a chairman will become effective once approved by the Council.

8 FINANCE 8.1 All surplus income or profits are to be reinvested in the Club. No surpluses or assets will be distributed to members or third parties. 8.2 The Council shall arrange for proper accounts to be kept recording all transactions made on behalf of the Club. These accounts will be maintained under the direction of the Treasurer. 8.3 If at any time the Council shall pass a resolution authorising the Managing Trustees to borrow money, the Managing Trustees shall thereupon be empowered to borrow on behalf of the Club for the purposes of the Club such amount of money either at one time or by instalments from time to time and at such a rate of interest and in such form and manner and upon such security, as shall be specified in such resolution. 8.4 Any new sums intended to be borrowed exceeding £100,000 must first be approved by the members in general meeting before any Council resolution can be passed. Similarly, any proposed sale, purchase, lease or mortgage or pledge of land, or any like transaction of any other property of the Club with a value in excess of £100,000 must first be approved by the members in general meeting. 8.5 The Council shall arrange for the accounts of the Club to be audited annually by the Club’s Auditors. A report and abstract of the accounts of the Club for the previous year, certified by the Auditors and signed by the Chairman and Treasurer, shall be printed and circulated to each member with the notice convening the AGM. 8.6 The Club’s financial year runs from January 1. By October 1, the Executive Committee will agree the Budget Planning targets with the Treasurer. The Treasurer will present, on behalf of the Finance Committee, budgets for the following year to the Council at or before its December meeting. 8.7 The Council shall authorise two or more people to sign cheques drawn on the Club’s bank accounts or otherwise authorise payments via the electronic banking systems of the Club’s bankers.

9 PREMISES 9.1 The Council shall arrange for the Club premises and grounds to be available for its sports and other activities and shall provide facilities and equipment from Club funds as may be necessary from time to time. The Council, Executive Committee and Sports or other Section Committees may also issue Codes of Conduct for the use of the premises with which all members must comply. Members shall at all times exercise due care and respect for the premises and all fixtures and equipment. 9.2 The hours and conditions for the supply of intoxicating liquor in the Club shall be fixed from 8 time to time by the Council and shall be in accordance with the Licensing Acts. From time to time the Council may make application for an extension of Licensing hours for social events.

10 TENNIS ONLY 10.1 Defined terms relating to this part (rule 10) of the Constitution only. 10.1.1 In these rules, unless the context requires otherwise: ‘Disciplinary Code’ means the the disciplinary code of the LTA in force from time to time. ‘LTA’ means LTA CLG and its subsidiaries or such successor entity or entities as become(s) the governing body of the game of lawn tennis from time to time. ‘Tennis Member’ means a member of the Ipswich Sports Club (the Club) who is a member of the Council, a member of the Tennis Committee, a member who plays tennis at the Club, a member who is a tennis coach or a member who otherwise assists in the playing or organisation of tennis at the Club. ‘Rules’ means the rules of the LTA as in force from time to time. 10.2 Conditions of membership 10.2.1 Each Tennis Member agrees as a condition of membership: (A) to be bound by and subject to these rules (as in force from time to time) (B) to be bound by and subject to the Rules and the Disciplinary Code 10.2.2 Rule 10.2.1 confers a benefit on the LTA and, subject to the remaining provisions of this rule, is intended to be enforceable by the LTA by virtue of the Contracts (Rights of Third Parties) Act 1999. For the avoidance of doubt, the Tennis Members do not intend that any term of these rules, apart from rule 10.2.1, should be enforceable, by virtue of the Contracts (Rights of Third Parties) Act 1999, by any person who is not a party to this agreement. 10.2.3 The Council may terminate the membership of any person, or impose any other sanction they determine to be appropriate, in connection with the breach of any condition of membership set out in this rule. 10.3 The Council The Club agrees that each member of the Council will be required, as a condition of election or appointment, to agree to be bound by and subject to these rules, the Rules and the Disciplinary Code, such agreement to contain an express acknowledgement that the Contracts (Rights of Parties) Act 1999 applies and that the LTA and the Club can enforce any breach at its option and in its sole discretion. 10.4 Coaches and players The Club agrees that all unlicensed and unregistered coaches (if any) and, so far as is reasonably practicable, players and other persons using the tennis related facilities of the Club will be required, as a condition of such use, to agree to be bound by and subject to these rules, the Rules and the Disciplinary Code, such agreement to contain an express acknowledgement that the Contracts (Rights of Third Parties) Act 1999 applies and that the LTA and the Club can enforce any breach at its option and in its sole discretion. 

11 DISSOLUTION 11.1 If at any general meeting a resolution for the dissolution of the Club is passed by a majority of the members present and at an extraordinary general meeting held not less than six weeks later (of which not less than four weeks’ written notice has been given to each member) and at which not less than 10% or 100 whichever is the lower of members entitled to vote are present that resolution is confirmed by a resolution passed by a majority of not less than three quarters of the members entitled to vote upon such resolution the provisions of rule 11.2 shall apply. For the purpose of such vote, voting by proxy shall be permitted and rule 4.11 shall be amended accordingly. 11.2 Upon any resolution being carried in accordance with the provisions of rule 11.1, the Council shall immediately or with effect from such date as may be specified in the resolution, proceed to realise the property and assets of the Club. 11.3 Upon dissolution of the Club any remaining assets shall be given or transferred by the Council towards one or more of the following bodies as the Council may determine (but not otherwise) namely: a. another registered community amateur sports club b. a registered charity and/or c. the national governing body, or bodies, within Great Britain for the sports of tennis, squash and hockey for use by them in related community sports.

12 KNOWLEDGE OF RULES 12.1 These rules and the following regulations and standing orders shall be printed and a copy of them including any amendments made from time to time shall be available to members in the Clubhouse and on the Club’s website. Ignorance of any item does not excuse members from the obligation to observe them. 12.2 These rules can only be changed by resolution passed at a general meeting with the requisite majority. The Council has the power to make and revise the following regulations and standing orders as it considers necessary for the management and well being of the Club provided that they shall not prejudice the Club’s status as a Community Amateur Sports Club. Such amended regulations and standing orders shall be valid and effective until the next Annual General Meeting when they must be ratified or the amendments shall lapse. 12.3 Any question as to the proper interpretation of any rule, regulation or standing order shall be referred to the Council whose decision shall be final. 12.4 Any matter arising which is not addressed by these rules, regulations and standing orders shall be determined by the Executive Committee or Council whose decision shall be final.

13 NOTICES AND INTERPRETATION 13.1 The Club can send, make available or supply any notice, ballot paper, accounts, document, or other information by personal delivery, by posting it to the intended receipient’s usual address, by sending it or supplying it in electronic form to an address notified by the intended recipient to the Club or by making it available on the Club website and notifying the intended recipient of its availability in accordance with this rule. It is the responsibility of members to notify the Club of any change of email or postal address. A general communication to members shall not be ineffective for the purposes of these rules if due to the accidental failure to give notice to any person entitled to notice, or the accidental omission of any details in any such notice and such omission/s shall not invalidate the proceedings of any relevant Club meeting. 10 13.2 In these rules and the subsequent regulations and standing orders: words denoting the singular number include the plural number and vice versa; words denoting the masculine gender include the feminine gender; and words denoting persons include bodies corporate (however incorporated) and unincorporated, including unincorporated associations of persons and partnerships ‘member entitled to vote’ shall mean any member other than a Junior Member or a Temporary Member or a member who has only been a member of the Club for less than 12 months immediately prior to the date of any notice under rule 4.1, the date of the relevant general meeting or the deadline for returns in a postal referendum (as the case may be). Appendix Sample Sports Committee Rules (none yet drafted) 11 Regulations and Standing Orders of Ipswich Sports Club (as approved by the Club Council 13th May 2014 and ratified by the Members on 11th June 2014) CONTENTS 1 Operation of the Club 2 Employees & self employed personnel 3 On-site suppliers 4 Sports and other Sections 5 Premises 6 Dress 7 Complaints 1 Operation of the Club 1.1 The General Manager is responsible for the day to day operation of the Club and may formally delegate where appropriate, in particular – the safety of the premises for members, staff and visitors in accordance with any relevant legislation – the maintenance of the premises including outside areas – the stocking of the bar – the employment contracts of employees whether directly employed by the Club or self-employed. The management and implementation of such contracts including taxation matters where appropriate. – the relationship with on-site suppliers, eg retailers, sports academies – co-ordinate the activities of the principal sports with the Sports Chairmen – ensure that on at least one period of not less than 24 hours each year, possibly Christmas Day, the entrances to the Club ground/s are closed to avoid the unintentional creation of a public right of way 2 Employees & Self Employed Personnel 2.1 Every employee will have a contract of employment which will set out their obligations to the Club, their remuneration, the contractual period and termination process, and have an agreed review process and timetable. 2.2 All employees must be appropriately qualified for their position 2.3 Self-employed personnel are responsible for their own tax affairs and must hold public liability insurance to the value of £2,000,000. 2.4 Self-employed personnel may employ additional staff and will be solely responsible for their management. 2.5 Self-employed personnel may not represent themselves as being employed by the Club or representing the Club (except when playing for a Club team). 3. On-site Suppliers 3.1 The Club will typically have two types of on-site suppliers; retailers, ie sports shop, hairdresser, physiotherapist; and service providers, ie sports academies. 3.2 Retailers will have a contract with the Club, owned by the Club Manager, setting out the business of the retailer, their obligations to the Club including any neccessary insurance provision. 12 3.3 Retailers’ contracts will state the value of the rent, the period of the contract and the termination procedures. 3.4 Service providers, eg academies may be used by self-employed staff to deliver the full range of their contractual obligation to the Club. 3.5 The legal and financial framework of the service provider is solely the responsibility of its management and must have no implications for the Club’s legal and financial framework beyond the contractual obligations between the Club and the service provider’s manager. 3.6 The service provider is responsible for the health and safety of its staff. 3.7 Unless otherwise agreed in writing by the Council the service provider must not claim to represent the Club, but in all its publicity must refer to the Club, ie “The JK Academy at Ipswich Sports Club”. 4. Sports and other Sections 4.1 Sports and other Section Chairmen must submit written reports for consideration at every Council meeting and meet with the Executive Committee at least twice a year. 4.2 The playing fees of each sport or activity shall be decided from time to time by the Council in consultation with the relevant Committee. 4.3 No visitor shall play or use sports facilities more than 6 times in any 12 months period. 5 Premises 5.1 The General Manager may issue notices and guidance to members concerning the use of premises and the operation of the Club. No notice of any kind other than official Club notices shall be put up in the Club without outhority being obtained from the General Manager. 5.2 The Club accepts no responsibility for articles of value left in the Club premises or elsewhere by members, guests or others. 5.3 The hours and conditions for the supply of Intoxicating liquor in the Club shall be fixed from time to time by the Council and shall be in accordance with the Licensing Acts. From time to time the Council may make application for an extension of Licensing hours for social events. 5.4 Members under 14 years of age are not permitted in the Bar area unless accompanied by their parents or a responsible adult. Unaccompanied Members and guests under 14 years of age should use the games room adjacent to the Bar for post-sporting activities. Members and guests under the age of 18 are not permitted to have supplied to them intoxicating liquor or to consume intoxicating liquor on Club premises. 5.5 No dogs other than Guide dogs are allowed on the Club premises or grounds. 5.6 Members must use the proper entrances and exits to the Club premises and grounds. No other opening may be used without prior agreement in writing obtained from the Club Manager. 5.7 To ensure that no public right of way is inadvertantly created 5.6 Smoking is not permitted in the Clubhouse or any other indoor area or sporting area. 6 Dress 6.1 Members using the Clubhouse and Bar are expected to dress in an appropriate manner, giving due consideration to other members. 6.2 Players must at all times wear recognised clothing and suitable footwear as prescribed by each Sports Section Committee for their respective areas of activity. 13 7 Complaints All complaints shall be made in writing to the General Manager for reference initially to the Executive Committee. If necessary they will be dealt with by the Council whose decision will be final. In no circumstances shall any employee of the Club be reprimanded directly by any member.

GDPR Member’s Privacy Policy

ISC Member Privacy Policy (21.05.2018) – Page 1 of 4 Ipswich Sports Club and Ipswich Sports Club Services Limited Services Limited Member Privacy Policy

INTRODUCTION This privacy policy sets out how we use and protect any information that you give to us when you visit the Club website or apply to become a member of the Club. We are committed to ensuring that your privacy is protected. Should we ask you to provide certain information by which you can be identified when using our website or becoming a member, then you can be assured that it will only be used in accordance with this privacy policy. Regarding the website and the Club’s associated membership and marketing activities, Ipswich Sports Club manages personal data in a way that is fully compliant with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Your privacy is of the highest importance to us and we will never release your personal details to any third party without your express consent. If you are already a member, applying for membership or use the Club’s facilities, certain personal information is collected from you (for example: your name, email address, date of birth, contact number, gender, bank details (where appropriate), category of membership and main interests). We are acting as the controller of your data and all such information is held securely by Ipswich Sports Club; Ipswich Sports Club endeavours to comply with all applicable Data Protection and Consumer Regulations and will treat all your personal information as confidential. We may change this policy from time to time by updating this document and will notify you accordingly. This policy is effective from 21 May 2018.

WHAT WE COLLECT We may collect the following information:

  • Name
  • Date of birth
  • Email address
  • Telephone numbers
  • Gender 
  • Category of membership
  • Bank details
  • Marital status
  • Club activity preferences
  • Notes for all correspondence
  • Medical information (as appropriate)

WHAT WE DO WITH THE INFORMATION WE GATHER We require this information to understand your needs and provide you with a better service and for the following reasons:

  • Internal record keeping in accordance with being a member.
  • To fulfil our contractual obligations to you as a member.
  • To improve our products and services. ISC Member Privacy Policy (21.05.2018) – Page 2 of 4
  • We may periodically send emails/enewsletters about member information, social activities, competitions, results or other information about similar services, which we think you may find interesting using the email address which you have provided.
  • We may use the information to customise the website according to your interests. This information is not shared with third parties.

CONTACT POLICY We would like you to be able to receive member and Club notices, bookings, catering and coaching confirmations, news about the courses we offer and social events. We do this in various ways including enewsletters, email, phone and social media.

  • Enewsletters When joining the Club, members will automatically be subscribed to the Club mailing system. Please note that from time to time important information about changes to membership fees/categories, Club general notices/rules and AGM/EGM details/Club Accounts, important section information, on-site businesses offers, closures of facilities, as well as some social events and other information the Club feel members should be aware of, are emailed to our members by way of our enewsletters and may not be available otherwise. Members can change their preferences by clicking ‘update subscription preferences’ at the bottom of the enewsletters we send to you. We recommend members retain ‘Club’ as a minimum subscription to receive the most important announcements eg. changes to membership fees/categories, Club general notices/rules and AGM/EGM details/Club Accounts, opening times and facility closures. Members may ‘unsubscribe’ from the enewsletter mailing list at any time via phone, email membership@ipswichsports.co.uk or by clicking ‘unsubscribe’ at the bottom of any enewsletter sent out.
  • Marketing Activities We capture all prospective new member and function booking enquiry data via an enquiry form. We will seek permission with the prospective new member or function enquirer for a follow up call or return visit during the initial enquiry. We will no longer contact you regarding your membership or function enquiry if you advise us not to do so either in person, by phone or by emailing membership@ipswichsports.co.uk or functions@ipswichsports.co.uk respectively unless you become a member or book a function at the Club, at which time we will only contact you in relation to managing your membership or function booking. We will retain enquiry data for no longer than is deemed necessary to carry out our business. Once data is no longer needed we will dispose of the data securely. We will never share your data with third parties.
  • Member Bookings If you are already a member, you will be given a login to our secure Member Portal which is based on a username and password, here you will be able to access Club documents (eg. Annual Accounts, AGM minutes etc). ISC Member Privacy Policy (21.05.2018) – Page 3 of 4 When making a booking for courts and/or studio classes our online system will automatically generate booking confirmation and reminder emails and notifications of peak time courts that are cancelled and become available for re-booking. You can remove all of these by logging in to ClubNet, via the website with your username and password and going to ‘My Menu’ then ‘My Details’ and un-checking the various options.
  • Food All members and guests who make a reservation for our food nights or events, will be asked for contact details. These details are taken at the time of the booking so that we can contact you if there are any changes to the event/food night etc. We will never share your data with third parties.
  • Sports We may contact members and guests who have either booked or expressed an interest in sports coaching courses, MultiSports and/or any other Club activity offered at that time. For ClubSpark (online tennis course bookings) please email tennis@ipswichsports.co.uk if you wish to cancel your account. This is our simple customer contact promise: Your privacy is very important to us which is why we make sure you are always in control of what we do with your personal information. We will never pass on your personal details, we do however use third party software to manage our membership database and member communication; our data processors are ClubNet www.clubnet.org.uk/ and our communication is via MailChimp and the LTA recommended coaching bookings software ‘ClubSpark’. We will only use your details to help personalise communications. We will make sure our contact with you is relevant based on the information you give us. We will always comply with the Data Protection Act 1998 and the GDPR. Please do let us know if your details change so that we can keep our records up-to-date and continue to stay in touch.

SECURITY We are committed to ensuring that your information is secure. To prevent unauthorised access or disclosure, we have put in place suitable physical, electronic and managerial procedures to safeguard and secure the information we collect from you. International transfers of your personal information We do not transfer your personal information to International third parties. ISC Member Privacy Policy (21.05.2018) – Page 4 of 4 Personal Data Security and Confidentiality We maintain adequate technical and organisational security measures to protect your personal information from loss, misuse, unauthorised access, disclosure, alteration or destruction. Access and Correction Rights You can request access to, and can update and amend your personal information and you can exercise any other rights you enjoy under applicable data protection laws, including, for example, objection to and blocking of the processing of your personal information, by contacting us – for security reasons, we reserve the right to take steps to authenticate your identity before providing access to your personal information. You will not be charged for this request. Retention of data We will keep your personal information for as long as necessary for the purposes for which it was collected, to provide you with services and to conduct our legitimate business interests or where otherwise required by law. We are required under UK tax law to keep your basic personal data for membership (name, address, contact details) for a minimum of 7 years following your resignation form the Club after which time it will be destroyed. The information we use for marketing purposes will be kept until you notify us that you no longer wish to receive this information. More information on our retention policy can be gained from the Club Secretary.

CHANGES TO THE POLICY We reserve the right, at our sole discretion, to modify, add or remove sections of this privacy policy at any time and any changes will be notified to you using the email address you have given us or by an announcement on the webpage available at the “Privacy Policy” link.

PRIVACY QUERIES If you have any questions regarding this policy, or you wish to update your details or remove your personal data from our records, please email the General Manager, Andrew Yorke manager@ipswichsports.co.uk Our Data Protection Officer is Pascale Cadier, who can be contacted by: Telephone: 01473 251143 or email: membership@ipswichsports.co.uk Further information about Data Protection can be obtained from the Information Commissioners Office at the ICO web site www.ico.org.uk. Yours sincerely Andrew Yorke General Manager.

Player Code of Conduct (parents & juniors)

23 May 2019 Player Code of Conduct The Code of Conduct outlines the standards and behaviours that are expected of all players, coaches and parents who are associated with the Club/Academy. It has been created to ensure that everyone can experience a safe, welcoming and friendly environment and help our players achieve everything they can in the game.

For players

  • Respect your opponents and other players in your lessons at all times.
  • Respect your coach at all times.
  • Treat others as you would like to be treated.
  • Inform your coach if you are going to be away or late.
  • Always wear suitable clothing for lessons/training and events.
  • Be responsible for preparing your bag with everything you may need for your session – rackets, drink, energy bar, towel, spare grip etc.
  • Treat all equipment with respect – no racket or ball abuse during sessions.
  • Inform your coach of any injuries or illnesses you may have before the warm up begins.
  • Do not use bad language.
  • Show good sportsmanship and etiquette at all times – play by the rules.
  • Always try your best at tournaments and put 100% into your preparation and lessons.
  • Project a positive image of Ipswich Sports Club when playing or competing at another club.
  • Clear away litter and use the bins provided. Players will be warned by the coach for inappropriate behaviour as per the LTA Code of Conduct / England Squash Rules and then asked to leave if this happens a second time. If a player fails to follow the codes of conduct in the Academy sessions, they will be asked to leave the session and the reasons for this will be explained to the parents.

For parents

  • Encourage your child to learn the rules and participate within them.
  • Discourage challenging/arguing with the coaches/officials.
  • Publicly accept the umpires/referees/coaches’ decisions.
  • Help your child to recognise good performance and find positive feedback even in defeat.
  • Never force your child to take part if they don’t want to.
  • Set a good example of recognising good sportsmanship and applauding the good performances of everyone.
  • Always ensure your child is dressed appropriately for the activity and has plenty to drink.
  • Keep the Club informed if your child is unable to attend sessions or matches.
  • Keep your coaches informed of any changes in your child’s health or if they have any injuries that will affect their participation.
  • Never punish or belittle a child for poor performance or making mistakes.  Support your child’s involvement and help them to enjoy their sport.

Safeguarding Information

Safeguarding Information for Club Members & Visitors The Club is proud to work alongside the following organisations in carrying out its activities:

Ipswich Sports Club A safe environment for everyone to enjoy sport Ipswich Sports Club Henley Road IPSWICH IP1 4NJ Tel: Ipswich Sports Club is committed to safeguarding vulnerable people and we expect everyone who works in or visits the Club to share this commitment. May 2019 Ipswich Sports Club has excellent sporting, leisure and social facilities situated in a convenient location close to Ipswich Town Centre, to the west side of Ipswich in Henley Road.

The Club is a members run Community Amateur Sports Club and offers memberships to the whole community. Some of our activities and services are provided by our wholly owned subsidiary Ipswich Sports Club Services Ltd.

Signs and Symptoms are:

  • Signs of radicalization (the prevent duty), ie. sign that a vulnerable person is vulnerable to extremist views, contrary to the rule of British law and democratic values.;
  • Neglect, ie. regularly unfed or unkempt.
  • Sexual abuse, ie. talk about sex in an inappropriate way for their age.
  • Physical abuse, ie. bruises or other injuries.
  • Emotional abuse, ie. talk about violence at home or being told they are not wanted. These are only a few examples. A more detailed explanation is available as part of our Safeguarding Policy which is available on request, and available on the Club website: www.ipswichsportsclub.co.uk/safeguarding. It is not the responsibility of Club staff or members, volunteers or visitors to form judgements or to make enquiries of parents or others involved, it is our duty to listen. The investigations are the statutory duty of others to perform.

DO NOT PROMISE CONFIDENTIALITY

  • Tactfully and sympathetically listen to the concerns of the vulnerable person. Do not ask questions. (These allegations may lead to criminal proceedings and your actions could jeopodise police investigation).
  • Report any incidents or signs immediately in writing to the Safeguarding Officer using a safeguarding form (available from Club Reception upon request).
  • Keep a note of the date and time.  Tell the vulnerable person you need to make sure they are safe and that you are required to report what they tell you for their own safety. Alternatively, anyone can report any concerns they may have regarding the safety of any vulnerable person directly to the NSPCC on 0808 800 5000. If you have any concerns regarding the behavior of Club staff or members, volunteers or visitors towards vulnerable people, inform the Safeguarding Officer, the police or the Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) in Ipswich on 01473 265359.

The LADO should be informed when it is alleged that:

  • Club staff or members, volunteers or visitors behaved in a way that has harmed a vulnerable person, or may have harmed a vulnerable person;
  • Club staff or members, volunteers or visitors may have possibly committed a criminal offence against or related to a vulnerable person;
  • Club staff or members, volunteers or visitors may have behaved towards a vulnerable person in a way that indicates he or she would pose a risk of harm if they work regularly or closely with vulnerable people. If the allegation is made against the Safeguarding Officer, the Club General Manager should be informed. Contact information is available via the Club website: www.ipswichsportsclub.co.uk. Within the Club, the designated Safeguarding Officers are: Karen Watling & Alistair Livingstone Our Club members and visitors can report any safeguarding concerns electronically at any time via email. Initial referrals will be dealt with by Karen Watling: karenwatling@btinternet.com. How to Safeguard Vulnerable People We all have a statutory duty to report any incidents where we have cause to suspect that a vulnerable person is suffering or is likely to suffer significant harm. If you have any concerns, please request a safeguarding referral form from Club Reception and pass it to our Designated Safeguarding Officer along with your contact details.

Welfare Officer Role Description

Welfare Officer Role Description The Welfare Officer is responsible for promoting safeguarding within their venue and working with others to ensure a safe and inclusive environment is achieved The Welfare Officer must not be a member of the venue’s coaching team and should not be related to a member of the coaching team (for example, their spouse).

The Welfare Officer should be someone over the age of 18.

Main duties

  • Work with others in the club to promote safeguarding, diversity and inclusion and ensure compliance with the LTA’s minimum standards for venue registration
  • Work with others in the club to ensure safeguarding and diversity and inclusion information, including policies, reporting procedures and details of the venue Welfare Officer are visible and available
  • Work with others in the club to promote the venue’s Code of Conduct(s)
  • Ensure safeguarding and diversity and inclusion is on the agenda at committee meetings
  • Act as the first point of contact for all children and adults where concerns about welfare, discrimination, poor practice or abuse are identified
  • Work with the LTA Safeguarding Team when concerns arise within the venue
  • Maintain contact details for the LTA Safeguarding Team and key statutory agencies
  • Contact the Local Authority children’s or adults’ social care teams and the police about concerns where appropriate
  • Work with the LTA Safeguarding Team to facilitate audits of the venue in relation to the minimum standards
  • Work with the Committee/Management and LTA to facilitate the completion of any action plan to address the results of an audit
  • Work with others in the venue to ensure the relevant people at the venue have completed a satisfactory criminal records check Skills and traits
  • Tactful and discrete
  • Able to resolve conflict
  • Engaging and supportive
  • Approachable and trustworthy
  • Good listener and friendly
  • Caring and understanding
  • Professional and helpful Training
  • Safeguarding and Protection in Tennis (or another course approved by the LTA) – required
  • Time to Listen – required
  • Yearly updates – optional Key relationships
  • Chairperson and management committee
  • Coaches
  • Volunteers at the venue
  • All members – junior and senior, plus parents/carers of junior members Time commitment
  • Attendance at key venue events, such as open days and junior competition
  • Attendance at management committee meetings Criminal records check
  • Essential for this role – see here for more information

Zero Tolorence

March 2019 MEMBER NOTICE Zero Tolerance Policy Abusive or Aggressive Behaviour towards Staff Our staff come to work for the benefit of our membership and it is important for all staff to be treated with courtesy and respect.

To ensure this is fully observed, the Club has a Zero Tolerance policy – this means that abusive, aggressive or violent behaviour or language towards our staff will not be tolerated under any circumstances. Anyone giving verbal abuse to members of staff, either in person, over the telephone, via social media or email will be sent a letter from the Club Council advising that this behaviour will not be tolerated. Any violation of this policy can lead to termination of membership. We feel sure that you will understand that proper behaviour is absolutely necessary for our staff and that non-observance will not be accepted.

Tennis Welfare

Photography & Recording Policy

Photography and Recording Policy Parents, Carers and Spectators The LTA encourages you to use photographic equipment to capture your child or friend playing tennis.

You are required to register at an event if you wish to use any photographic equipment.

The event organiser will ask anyone not registered to stop using photographic equipment and delete any images that may have been taken. If you have concerns about inappropriate photography, this should be reported immediately to the event organiser, official or welfare officer. Competition Organisers, Officials and other Professionals If you are running an event, the LTA requests that you ensure that all parents, carers and spectators who want to use photographic equipment are registered with you.

If you wish to take photographs at an event or publish images following an event you must ensure you have consent from parents, carers or the individual (if over 18) prior to the event and that you are registered with the event organiser. If you see any individual taking photographs which you deem to be intrusive or inappropriate you must address this in line with safeguarding procedures.

Children It is okay for a photographer to take photos when you are on court, as long as your parent or carer has told the photographer it is alright. If you see someone taking photos or filming that makes you feel worried, tell your parent or carer, or the event organiser or welfare officer straight away.

Consent In order to take photographs or videos, prior to any event, you should ensure you have obtained consent from:

  • The event organiser; and • Parents, carers of all children involved. In order to obtain consent you must explain why you are taking the images and what they will be used for. This ensures that parents or carers are giving informed consent. To achieve this it is strongly recommended you use the Consent and Emergency Contact Form. Image and video content All children featured in images or videos must be:
  • Appropriately dressed with clothing covering their torso from their neck to thighs, e.g. a t-shirt and shorts or skirt;
  • Featured with people engaging in tennis; • In groups with other children or adults where possible; and
  • Representative of the diversity across tennis, with regard to age, gender, ethnicity and disability. Any inappropriate use of images should be reported to the LTA Safe and Inclusive Tennis Team and the Police. 1 Photographing and Videoing in Public Spaces There is no law prohibiting the photography of individuals (including children) in public places. Subject to the below, individuals are permitted to:
  • take photos of children without the consent of the parents/legal guardians, using a normal lens; and
  • keep photos taken, however, if the person wishes to publish a recognisable image of the child, they are required to gain consent from the parents/legal guardian. The above is permitted, provided the behaviour does not amount to harassment or a breach of privacy. Whether the behaviour amounts to harassment or a breach of privacy will depend on the facts in each case. In practice, you might not want to get into whether there has been a breach of privacy or if the conduct amounted to harassment. If an individual is taking photographs in a public space and this is making the children, coach or parents uncomfortable, it is best to approach the photographer and politely request they stop taking photographs and remind them they are required to gain consent from parents if they wish to publish any photos. NB: If the photographer has a long lens, they should be informed they are not allowed to use this when taking photos of people in public spaces. Publishing Images Remember to give adequate thought to the selection of images in publicity material both printed and online (including social media). Where possible, use a technique such as “watermarking” on the images. All children featured can only be:
  • Identified using their first name, although it is preferable that their name is not given;
  • Printed or uploaded with written consent from parents/carers; and
  • Shown engaging in tennis activities. For your safety it is recommended that you avoid the following:
  • Images of children on their own;
  • Images of children outside a tennis environment;
  • Streaming any content directly to a website; and
  • Using any images for which you have not obtained consent (please use the Consent and Emergency Contact Form). Please be aware that coaches, teachers and others may use video equipment as a legitimate coaching method. Tennis players and their parents or carers should be made aware this forms part of the tennis programme and that any recording will be destroyed after use. 

Safeguarding Policy

Version 1.2.15.01.2019 IPSWICH SPORTS CLUB Safeguarding Policy Policy Title: Safeguarding Policy Page 2 of 12 Last Updated: January 2019 Next Review: January 2020 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) Reporting a Safeguarding Concern within the Tennis Environment How to respond to allegations against a member of staff/volunteer or another young person within the Tennis Environment. For Tennis Wales / Tennis Scotland cases, on-going consultation will take place with them. Concerns arise about the behaviour of a member of staff, coach or volunteer towards a child/children.

Make a note of anything you/the witness has seen/said, with dates and times Is there an immediate risk to a young person or vulnerable adult? YES NO Crime/Immediate risk: Call Police/ Social Services Medical: Call an Ambulance Is the Club Welfare Officer available? YES NO If your Club Welfare Officer is unavailable please contact the Safeguarding Team for advice and complete the LTA’s online concern form. Club Welfare Officer contacts the Safeguarding Team for advice and guidance and completes the LTA’s online concern Level 2 Serious form (if outstanding). Concern (i.e. suspected abuse) LTA inform SPC, conduct investigation, inform Police/LADO Level 1 (Low level i.e. poor practice) LTA investigate or tennis venue investigate with support from the LTA Appeal process Concern dealt with by club (internal discipline/appeals process). If LTA disciplinary investigation undertaken a hearing is held by Safeguarding and Protection Committee or Licensing and Registration Committee.

Outcome of disciplinary process (e.g. no case to answer, advice or warning/sanction) Useful Contacts British Tennis Services team: 020 8487 7000 Email: safeandinclusive@lta.org.uk NSPCC: 0808 800 5000 Emergency Services: 999 Safeguarding Team in conjunction with SPC makes decision as to Level of concern. LTA consults with SPC* re interim suspension and notifying other organisations. Consultation with Police/LADO and strategy discussion to agree investigative process. Internal Investigation may be delayed pending police enquiries.

LTA await outcome of Children’s Social Care or Police investigation (e.g. NFA, criminal prosecution, assessment of risk). Full disciplinary investigation undertaken and SPC hearing held. Outcome i.e. removal of coach accreditation, further training, approved for accreditation. Note: You should inform the parent/carer of the concern, unless you believe it would put the child/adult at risk, yourself or others at risk If you are unable to contact the Welfare Officer or the LTA Safeguarding Team, please contact the NSPCC or your Local Authority Children’s Services Team and follow their advice LTA Online Concern Form: https://safeguardingc oncern.lta.org.uk/ Policy Title: Safeguarding Policy Page 3 of 12 Last Updated: January 2019 Next Review: January 2020 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) Policy Title: Safeguarding Policy Page 4 of 12 Last Updated: January 2019 Next Review: January 2020 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) Safeguarding Policy

1. Policy statement The Ipswich Sports Club is committed to prioritising the well-being of all children and adults at risk, promoting safeguarding in our club at all times, including all programmes and events we run. All activities, events and competitions arranged by the club run in accordance with the LTA’s Safeguarding at Events, Activities and Competitions guidance. This Policy strives to minimise risk, deliver a positive tennis experience for everyone and respond appropriately to all safeguarding concerns/disclosures.

2. Use of terminology Child: a person under the age of eighteen years. Note that some legislation in Scotland defines a child as a person under sixteen years old. However, where there is any safeguarding concern, anyone under the age of 18 is regarded as a child unless advised otherwise by the LTA Safeguarding Team . Adult at risk: a person aged eighteen years or over who is, or may be, in need of community care services by reason of disability, age or illness; and is, or may be, unable to take care of, or unable to protect him or herself against abuse or neglect. Safeguarding children: protecting children from abuse and neglect, preventing the impairment of children’s health or development, ensuring that they grow up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care, and taking action to enable all children to have the best life chances. Safeguarding adults at risk: protecting adults from abuse and/or neglect. Enabling adults to maintain control over their lives and make informed choices without coercion. Empowering adults at risk, consulting them before taking action, unless someone lacks the capacity to make a decision, or their mental health poses a risk to their own or someone else’s safety, in which case, always acting in his or her best interests. (See appendix A for full glossary of terms).

3. Scope This Policy is applicable to all staff, volunteers, committee members, coaches and club members. It is in line with national legislation and applicable across the UK. Advice, guidance and support is available from the LTA Safeguarding Team.

4. Responsibility for the implementation of the Safeguarding Policy, Code of Conduct and Reporting Procedure SAFEGUARDING IS EVERYONE’S RESPONSIBILITY: NOT RESPONDING TO A SAFEGUARDING CONCERN IS NOT AN OPTION.

  • Our club’s committee has overall accountability for this Policy and its implementation
  • Our club Welfare Officer Karen Watling is responsible for updating this Policy in line with legislative and club developments
  • All individuals involved in/present at the club are required to adhere to the Policy and Code of Conduct
  • The LTA Safeguarding Team and Tennis Scotland, Tennis Wales and Tennis Foundation Safeguarding Leads can offer support to help clubs proactively safeguard. Policy Title: Safeguarding Policy Page 5 of 12 Last Updated: January 2019 Next Review: January 2020 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) Where there is a safeguarding concern/disclosure:
  • The individual who is told about, hears, or is made aware of the concern/disclosure is responsible for following the Reporting a Safeguarding Concern Procedure shown in the flowchart at the beginning of this policy. Unless someone is in immediate danger, they should inform their club Welfare Officer, LTA Safeguarding Team or National Safeguarding Lead.
  • The club Welfare Officer and Safeguarding Leads are responsible for reporting safeguarding concerns to the LTA Safe Safeguarding Team.
  • The LTA Safeguarding Team is responsible for assessing all safeguarding concern/disclosures that are reported to them and working with the club Welfare Officer and National Safeguarding Leads to follow up as appropriate on a case-by-case basis, prioritising the well-being of the child/ adult at risk at all times. Dependent on the concern/disclosure, a referral may be made to:
  • The police in an emergency (999);
  • Local Authority Children’s Services Suffolk County Council – 0808 800 4005 or NSPCC 0800 800 5000
  • Local Authority Adult Services Suffolk County Council – 0808 800 4005
  • Designated Officer (England only) for concerns/disclosures about a member of staff, consultant, coach, official or volunteer Karen Watling (Welfare Officer) 5. Breaches of the Safeguarding Policy, Code of Conduct and Reporting Procedure Breaches of this Policy and/or failure to comply with the outlined responsibilities may result in the following:
  • Disciplinary action leading to possible exclusion from the club, dismissal and legal action

Termination of current and future roles within the club and roles in other clubs, the LTA, Tennis Wales, Tennis Scotland and the Tennis Foundation. Actions taken by players, parents or carers, staff, consultants, volunteers, officials, coaches inside or outside of the club that are seen to contradict this Policy may be considered a violation of this Policy. Where an appeal is lodged in response to a safeguarding decision made by the club, the individual should adhere to the club’s appeal procedure see What’s the Score toolkit]. 6. Whistleblowing Safeguarding children and adults at risk requires everyone to be committed to the highest possible standards of openness, integrity and accountability. As a club, we are committed to encouraging and maintaining a culture where people feel able to raise a genuine safeguarding concern and are confident that it will be taken seriously. What is whistle blowing? In the context of safeguarding, “whistle blowing” is when someone raises a concern about the well-being of a child or an adult at risk.

A whistle blower may be:

  • a player;
  • a volunteer;
  • a coach;
  • other member of staff;
  • an official;
  • a parent;
  • a member of the public. How to raise a concern about a child or an adult at risk at the club Policy Title: Safeguarding Policy Page 6 of 12 Last Updated: January 2019 Next Review: January 2020 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) If a child or an adult at risk is in immediate danger or risk of harm, the police should be contacted by calling 999. Where a child or an adult at risk is not in immediate danger, any concerns about their well-being should be made without delay to the Club Welfare Officer. The Club Welfare Officer will pass the details of the concern on to the LTA Safeguarding Team at the earliest opportunity and the relevant local authority and the police will be contacted, where appropriate. If, however, the whistle blower does not feel comfortable raising a concern with the Club Welfare Officer, the whistle blower should contact the LTA Safeguarding Team directly on 020 8487 7000, the Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) or the NSPCC on 0808 800 5000.
  • The Club Welfare Officer can be contacted on: 07706048502 Information to include when raising a concern The whistle blower should provide as much information as possible regarding the incident or circumstance which has given rise to the concern, including:  their name and contact details (unless they wish to remain anonymous);
  • names of individuals involved;
  • date, time and location of incident/circumstance; and
  • whether any witnesses were present. What happens next? All concerns raised by a whistle blower about the well-being of a child or an adult at risk will be taken seriously and every effort will be made to deal with each concern fairly, quickly and proportionately. If the whistle blower does not believe that the concern has been dealt with appropriately and wishes to speak to someone outside the club or the LTA Safeguarding Team, the NSPCC Whistleblowing advice line should be contacted on 0800 028 0285 or by emailing help@nspcc.org.uk. Support The club will not tolerate any harassment, victimisation or unfair treatment of, and will take appropriate action to protect, whistle blowers when they raise a concern in good faith.
  • Policy Title: Safeguarding Policy Page 7 of 12 Last Updated: January 2019 Next Review: January 2020 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) Codes of Conduct All members of staff, volunteers and members agree to:
  • Prioritise the well-being of all children and adults at risk at all times
  • Treat all children and adults at risk fairly and with respect
  • Be a positive role model. Act with integrity, even when no one is looking
  • Help to create a safe and inclusive environment both on and off court
  • Not allow any rough or dangerous behaviour, bullying or the use of bad or inappropriate language
  • Report all allegations of abuse or poor practice to the club Welfare Officer
  • Not use any sanctions that humiliate or harm a child or adult at risk
  • Value and celebrate diversity and make all reasonable efforts to meet individual needs
  • Keep clear boundaries between professional and personal life, including on social media
  • Have the relevant consent from parents/carers, children and adults before taking or using photos and videos
  • Refrain from making physical contact with children or adults unless it is necessary as part of an emergency or congratulatory (e.g. handshake / high five)
  • Refrain from smoking and consuming alcohol during club activities or coaching sessions
  • Ensure roles and responsibilities are clearly outlined and everyone has the required information and training
  • Avoid being alone with a child or adult at risk unless there are exceptional circumstances
  • Refrain from transporting children or adults at risk, unless this is required as part of a club activity (e.g. away match) and there is another adult in the vehicle
  • Not abuse, neglect, harm or discriminate against anyone; or act in a way that may be interpreted as such
  • Not have a relationship with anyone under 18 for whom they are coaching or responsible for
  • Be acutely aware of the power that coaches and coaching assistants develop over players in the coaching relationship and avoid any intimacy (sexual or otherwise) with players All children agree to:
  • Be friendly, supportive and welcoming to other children and adults
  • Play fairly and honestly
  • Respect club staff, volunteers and Officials and accept their decisions
  • Behave, respect and listen to your coach
  • Take care of your equipment and club property
  • Respect the rights, dignity and worth of all participants regardless of age, gender, ability, race, culture, religion or sexual identity
  • Not use bad, inappropriate or racist language, including on social media
  • Not bully, intimidate or harass anyone, including on social media
  • Not smoke, drink alcohol or drugs of any kind on club premises or whilst representing the club at competitions or events
  • Talk to the club Welfare Officer about any concerns or worries they have about themselves or others Policy Title: Safeguarding Policy Page 8 of 12 Last Updated: January 2019 Next Review: January 2020 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) All parents and carers agree to:
  • Positively reinforce your child and show an interest in their tennis
  • Use appropriate language at all times
  • Be realistic and supportive
  • Never ridicule or admonish a child for making a mistake or losing a match
  • Treat all children, adults, volunteers, coaches, officials and members of staff with respect
  • Behave responsibly at the venue; do not embarrass your child  Accept the official’s decisions and do not go on court or interfere with matches
  • Encourage your child to play by the rules, and teach them that they can only do their best
  • Deliver and collect your child punctually from the venue
  • Ensure your child has appropriate clothing for the weather conditions
  • Ensure that your child understands their code of conduct
  • Adhere to your venue’s safeguarding policy, diversity and inclusion policy, rules and regulations
  • Provide emergency contact details and any relevant information about your child including medical history This Policy is reviewed every two years (or earlier if there is a change in national legislation). This Policy is recommended for approval by: Club Committee Chair: Vanessa Penn Date: January 2019 Club Welfare Officer: Karen Watling Date: January 2020

Policy Title: Safeguarding Policy Page 9 of 12 Last Updated: January 2019 Next Review: January 2020 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) Appendix A: Glossary of Terms Safeguarding: protecting children from abuse and neglect, preventing the impairment of children’s health or development, ensuring that children are growing up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care, and taking action to enable all children to have the best life chances.

Enabling adults at risk to achieve the outcomes that matter to them in their life; protecting their right to live in safety, free from abuse and neglect. Empowering and supporting them to make choices, stay safe and raise any concerns. Beginning with the assumption that an individual is best-placed to make decisions about their own wellbeing, taking proportional action on their behalf only if someone lacks the capacity to make a decision, they are exposed to a life-threatening risk, someone else may be at risk of harm, or a criminal offence has been committed or is likely to be committed.

Abuse and neglect Physical abuse: A form of abuse which may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child or adult at risk. Physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces illness Sexual abuse: Involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in abuse sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening.

The activities may involve physical contact, including assault by penetration (for example, rape or oral sex) or nonpenetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing and touching outside of clothing. They may also include non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse (including via the internet). Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males.

Women can also commit acts of sexual abuse, as can other children Emotional abuse: The persistent emotional maltreatment of a child or adult at risk such as to cause severe and persistent adverse effects on their emotional development. It may involve conveying to a child/ adult at risk that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person; not giving them opportunities to express their views; deliberately silencing them or ‘making fun’ of what they say or how they communicate.

It may feature age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed, including interactions that are beyond a child or adult at risk’s developmental capability, as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing them participating in normal social interaction. It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another. It may involve serious bullying (including cyber bullying), causing a child or adult at risk to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children. Some level of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, though it may occur alone.

Neglect: The persistent failure to meet a child/ adult at risk’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of their health or development. It may involve a parent or carer failing to: o provide adequate food, clothing and shelter (including exclusion from home or abandonment); o protect a child/ adult at risk from physical and emotional harm or danger; o ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate care-givers); or o ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment. It may also include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child’s or adult at risk’s basic emotional needs. Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abuse. Additional examples of abuse and neglect of adults at risk Financial abuse: having money or property stolen; being defrauded; being put under pressure in relation to money or other property; and having money or other property misused.

Policy Title: Safeguarding Policy Page 10 of 12 Last Updated: January 2019 Next Review: January 2020 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) Discriminatory abuse: treating someone in a less favourable way and causing them harm, because of their age, gender, sexuality, gender identity, disability, socio-economic status, ethnic origin, religion and any other visible or non-visible difference. Domestic abuse: includes physical, sexual, psychological or financial abuse by someone who is, or has been a partner or family member. Includes forced marriage, female genital mutilation and honour-based violence (an act of violence based on the belief that the person has brought shame on their family or culture).

Domestic abuse does not necessarily involve physical contact or violence. Psychological abuse: including emotional abuse, threats of harm or abandonment, deprivation of contact, humiliation, blaming, controlling, intimidation, coercion, harassment, verbal abuse, isolation or withdrawal from services or supportive networks. Organisational abuse: where the needs of an individual are not met by an organisation due to a culture of poor practice or abusive behaviour within the organisation. Self-neglect: behaviour which threatens an adult’s personal health or safety (but not that of others). Includes an adult’s decision to not provide themselves with adequate food, clothing, shelter, personal hygiene, or medication (when indicated), or take appropriate safety precautions

Modern slavery: encompasses slavery, human trafficking, criminal and sexual exploitation, forced labour and domestic servitude. Traffickers and slave masters use whatever means they have at their disposal to coerce, deceive and force individuals into a life of abuse, servitude and inhumane treatment.

 A person who is being abused may experience more than one type of abuse

 Harassment, and bullying are also abusive and can be harmful

 Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is now recognised as a form of physical, sexual and emotional abuse that is practised across the UK

 Child Sexual Exploitation is recognised as a form of sexual abuse in which children are sexually exploited for money, power or status

 Child trafficking is recognised as child abuse where children are often subject to multiple forms of exploitation. Children are recruited, moved or transported to, or within the UK, then exploited, forced to work or sold

 People from all cultures are subject to abuse. It cannot be condoned for religious or cultural reasons

 Abuse can have immediate and long-term impacts on someone’s well-being, including anxiety, depression, substance misuse, eating disorders and self-destructive Conducts, offending and antisocial Conduct

 Those committing abuse are most often adults, both male and female. However, child-to-child abuse also takes place.

Policy Title: Safeguarding Policy Page 11 of 12 Last Updated: January 2019 Next Review: January 2020 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) Appendix B: What to do if a disclosure from a child or adult at risk is made to you:

1. Listen carefully and calmly to the individual

2. Reassure the individual that they have done the right thing and what they have told you is very important

3. Avoid questioning where possible, and never ask leading questions

4. Do not promise secrecy. Let the individual know that you will need to speak to the Welfare Officer/LTA Safeguarding Team because it is in their best interest. If you intend to speak to the police or social care, you should let them know this too.

5. Report the concern. In an emergency, call the police (999), otherwise talk to the Welfare Officer/LTA Safeguarding Team as soon as possible. Do not let doubt/personal bias prevent you from reporting the allegation

6. Record details of the disclosure and allegation using the LTA’s online reporting a concern form within 24 hours. If you do not have access to the online form, write down the details using what you have available then sign and date it.

Policy Title: Safeguarding Policy Page 12 of 12 Last Updated: January 2019 Next Review: January 2020 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) Appendix C: Reporting a Safeguarding Concern outside the Tennis Environment What to do if you are worried that a child is being abused outside the tennis environment (e.g. at home, school or in the community) but the concern is identified through the child’s involvement in tennis. For Tennis Wales / Tennis Scotland cases, on-going consultation will take place with them.

Member of staff, coach or volunteer made aware of concerns about child’s welfare or safety (e.g. suspicions of bullying at school, allegations of abuse within the family etc.) Make a note of anything the young person/witness has said, and what you have seen with dates and times. Does the young person require immediate attention? YES NO Call an Ambulance and inform them you have a child protection concern Is the Club Welfare Officer available? YES NO If your Club Welfare Officer is unavailable please contact the NSPCC or police/social care without delay.

The Safeguarding Team can be contacted for advice during office hours. Club Welfare Officer reports to local police/Social Care without delay. The Safeguarding team can be contacted for advice during office hours. Complete the LTA’s online concern form within 24 hours. Safeguarding Team consider need for support or advice for original referrer, Club Welfare Officer or others involved. Useful Contacts British Tennis Services team: 020 8487 7000 Email: safeandinclusive@lta.org.uk NSPCC: 0808 800 5000 Emergency Services: 999 Note:

You should inform the parent/carer of the concern, unless you believe it would put the child/adult at risk, yourself or others at risk LTA Online Concern Form: https://safeguardingc oncern.lta.org.uk/

Safeguarding Policy Statement

1 / 21/05/2019 IPSWICH SPORTS CLUB Safeguarding Policy Statement Ipswich Sports Club acknowledges the duty of care to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and adults at risk.

The Club is committed to ensuring safeguarding practice reflects statutory responsibilities, government guidance and complies with best practice and LTA requirements.

A copy of the Club’s full safeguarding policy is available from Karen Watling 07706 048502. The Club’s safeguarding policy recognises that the welfare and interests of children and adults at risk are paramount in all circumstances. It aims to ensure that regardless of age, ability or disability, gender reassignment, race, religion or belief, sex or sexual orientation, socio-economic background, all children:

  • have a positive and enjoyable experience of tennis at Ipswich Sports Club in a safe and inclusive environment
  • are protected from abuse whilst participating in tennis and all sports. Ipswich Sports Club acknowledges that some children, including disabled children and young people or those from ethnic minority communities, can be particularly vulnerable to abuse and we accept the responsibility to take reasonable and appropriate steps to ensure their welfare. As part of our safeguarding policy Ipswich Sports Club will:
  • promote and prioritise the safety and well-being of children and adults at risk
  • ensure everyone understands their roles and responsibilities in respect of safeguarding and is provided with appropriate learning opportunities to recognise, identify and respond to signs of abuse, neglect and other safeguarding concerns relating to children and adults at risk
  • ensure appropriate action is taken in the event of incidents/concerns of abuse and support provided to the individual/s who raise or disclose the concern
  • ensure that confidential, detailed and accurate records of all safeguarding concerns are maintained and securely stored
  • prevent the employment/deployment of unsuitable individuals
  • ensure robust safeguarding arrangements and procedures are in operation. The Club’s policy and procedures will be widely promoted and are mandatory for everyone involved in Ipswich Sports Club. Failure to comply with the policy and procedures will be addressed and may result in dismissal/exclusion from the Club. Service Providers Ipswich Sports Club recognises that there will be some occasions where a service is provided on behalf of ISC. When this happens ISC will seek to ensure that the service provider, where appropriate, has the same standards in respect of safeguarding. Where the service provider is subject to appropriate governance then the expectation is that they will comply with their safeguarding responsibilities. Where concerns are identified these will be dealt with appropriately and may result in another service provider being sought. Where the service being provided directly relates to children or vulnerable persons then checks will be made to ensure that there are no safeguarding concerns. Monitoring The Club’s safeguarding policy will be reviewed every two years, or sooner in the following circumstances:
  • changes in legislation and/or government guidance
  • as required by the Local Safeguarding Children Board or LTA
  • as a result of any other significant change or event. 12/09/2018

Policy and Guidance on Trans People Playing Tennis

Policy and guidance on trans people playing tennis. This policy has been written by the LTA Safe And Inclusive Tennis Team. It’s approved by the LTA’s CEO, Executive Team and Board. British Tennis Policy and Guidance on Trans Players Last updated: March 2017 Next Review: March 2019 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) Policy and guidance on trans people playing tennis. Policy on trans or transgender tennis players. Introduction Tennis is a sport that can be played by anyone and we are committed to ensuring that all people, whatever their background are engaged and involved in the sport; creating a safe and inclusive tennis environment that enables everyone to participate and feel welcome.

There are many things that you can do to ensure you are providing a safe and inclusive environment and you can find out more in What’s the Score that provides tools, tips and templates to help you achieve this. British Tennis regulates the participation of competitors in tennis competitions as set out by the LTA rules and our intention is that someone’s background should not be a barrier to participation in the sport. British Tennis has produced this policy to set out its position on participation by trans or transgender people as players and identify what you can do to welcome trans or transgender people to tennis and ensure they can participate fully in it. We use the term trans or transgender to describe those people who, as defined by the Equality Act 2010, share the protected characteristic of gender reassignment and are described as transsexual people. We do not include intersex people, androgyne and polygender people, cross-dressing and transvestite people in these terms.

Under current English legislation, tennis, as a gender-affected sport, may be regulated by British Tennis in respect of the participation of a transsexual person. We wish to try, as far as is possible, to permit trans people to compete in their affirmed gender while balancing this with our role in providing fair play and competition and protecting the integrity of women’s, men’s and mixed competitions. In addition to those wishing to compete, we also have a responsibility to protect those who may be staff, coaches, officials, volunteers or spectators, and who may be transsexual people, or perceived to be so, or associated with them, such as family members. However, this document focuses only on players, or would-be players, in tennis competitions.

1. Safe tennis All venues and individuals play a vital role in keeping children and adults safe, both embedding practices that help promote people’s well-being and responding to concerns if they arise. We know that both children and adults can disclose abuse and discrimination within the tennis environment, or externally – it could be in their home, school or workplace for example. However, we all have a legal and moral responsibility to report concerns; your venue Welfare Officer and the LTA Safe and Inclusive Tennis Team are great sources of support. This includes transphobic abuse where people who are trans or are perceived to be trans are victims of abuse. British Tennis Policy and Guidance on Trans Players Last updated: March 2017 Next Review: March 2019 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) Page 1 Policy and guidance on trans people playing tennis.

2. Inclusive tennis People from different backgrounds may have different needs and expectations and may experience barriers in trying to access tennis. A person’s age, disability, gender reassignment status, marriage or civil partnership status, pregnancy or maternity status, race, religion or faith, sex, sexual orientation, socio-economic or other background should not be a barrier to enjoying the game. Inclusive venues and coaches take proactive steps that enable everyone to access tennis, have a positive experience and the opportunity to achieve their potential – trans people are no exception to this.

3. Key terms We use a range of terms associated with trans people; we recognise that there are considerable differences in these and we have adopted the following terms: Trans or transgender – we use the term trans or transgender to describe those people who, as defined by the Equality Act 2010, share the protected characteristic of gender reassignment and are described as transsexual people. We do not include intersex people, androgyne and polygender people, cross-dressing and transvestite people under these terms. Gender reassignment – this is one of several protected characteristics defined in equality legislation (Equality Act 2010) and is the process of transitioning from one sex to another. This legislation prohibits discrimination against a person who is proposing to undergo, is undergoing or has undergone a process, or part of a process, for reassigning their sex. Although it is often associated with medical treatment, this is not a requirement to be protected by the law. Transsexual person – this describes someone with the protected characteristic (under the Equality Act 2010) of gender reassignment. We use the term transsexual man to describe a female-to-male transsexual person and transsexual woman to describe a male-tofemale transsexual person. This is not the same as a cross-dresser, or transvestite people, nor is it the same as sexual orientation. Affirmed gender – describes the gender that the person has transitioned to as opposed to that which is assigned at birth – their ‘birth gender’.

4. What language to use We would expect everyone in tennis to use the following preferred terms. Preferred terms Avoid trans, trans person, she-he transgender, he-she transgendered tranny person, transsexual man or woman, he, she, him, his, hers

5. Trans players – male and female As a non-contact sport, British Tennis sanctions men’s, mixed and women’s forms of the game. As such there are no safety concerns for any trans male or female wishing to take part in sanctioned tennis competitions or in training or friendly/ recreational tennis. British Tennis Policy and Guidance on Trans Players Last updated: March 2017 Next Review: March 2019 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) Page 2 Policy and guidance on trans people playing tennis. We recognise, however, that there may be some concerns about fairness in the women’s and mixed game. Our policy assumes that trans women (male-to-female trans person) wishing to compete in mixed or female sanctioned tennis competitions do so with the best of intentions and with no intent to deceive about their status to gain any competitive advantage. Accordingly, you should accept people in the gender they present and verification of their identity should be no more than that expected of any other player. Should someone have a genuine reason to believe that there may be some deception to gain a competitive advantage in the mixed or women’s game or that there are genuine and substantive concerns about the woman’s physical strength, stamina or physique that may put other female competitors at a disadvantage, they should refer their concerns to the LTA Safe and Inclusive Tennis Team. Players on the Performance Pathway Players on the performance pathway are there to train and challenge for a position in GB national squads. Players who have the status of gender reassignment and are in the top 500, or are seeking to represent GB in tennis or are in our defined performance pathway such as the Player Support Programme, will need to be compliant with the ITF policy. The latest ITF policy can be found on page 74 of the 2017 Pro Regulations: http://www.itftennis.com/ media/253215/253215.pdf We recognise that, for some people, the process of gender reassignment may start before joining the performance pathway or during it; we will work with each trans person on a case-by-case basis to ensure that they know about the implication of the international policy and are supported in their gender reassignment process.

6. Personal details on British Tennis Membership (BTM) system or other British Tennis database Where a trans person is new to the BTM system

1. When a new player registers with BTM then that person would be able to register with BTM with no verification of his or her sex needed. Where a trans person is already a BTM member and wishes to change their personal details, such as name or sex, on the system this will be handled slightly differently depending on whether the change has a significant impact on a player’s status in competition or not.

2. Changes to the BTM database can only be instigated if a BTM contacts the BT Services Team (Phone: +44 (0) 208 487 7000 or email info@lta.org.uk ) and requests the change. If the change is of a sensitive and confidential nature e.g. a sex change, then the change request will only be handled by those who need to know, and who all understand their legal obligation regarding data protection (usually Head of IT; Competition Officer; SIT Senior Manager).

3. Where changes are requested that do not have any significant impact on a player’s status in competition then these are made without any proof of the change. For British Tennis Policy and Guidance on Trans Players Last updated: March 2017 Next Review: March 2019 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) Page 3 Policy and guidance on trans people playing tennis. example, a Change of Name – no evidence of proof is asked of people for a change of name e.g. following marriage; accordingly, a request for a change of name for a trans person can be made in the same way.

4. Where changes have a significant impact on a player’s status in competition, for example changing a Date of Birth, Play County (someone’s eligibility to represent a county in a team-based competition) or a Change of Sex, that change will need to be backed up by proof. Change of sex – as this is a change that will have a significant impact on a player’s status, it can only be made if there is proof of the change. In the UK, people can change their name without any legal process, however proof of a change of sex could be any of the following:

  • Birth certificate, Passport or Driving Licence indicating relevant sex; a Deed Poll or a Statutory Declaration (before a solicitor or magistrate in court), or a doctor’s letter may also be used.
  • If none of the above are available, and, as the trans person will be known to BTM, then an alternative of a written, signed statement from the trans person to indicate that they intend to live in their acquired gender from then on can be accepted; it would help if this was endorsed by a member of the club e.g. club secretary if possible.
  • Please note that some trans people will go through the process of obtaining a Gender Recognition Certificate. This allows trans people born in the UK to automatically receive a new birth certificate and provides enhanced legal protection over the disclosure of their previous gender status. A GRC indicates that the person has already lived in the affirmed gender role, for at least two years and intends to continue doing so. It would be wholly inappropriate for anyone to request or require a person to provide a GRC as this is a breach of the person’s privacy and may be harassment. Welcoming trans people in tennis Inclusive venues and coaches take proactive steps that enable everyone to access tennis, have a positive experience and the opportunity to achieve their potential and trans people are no exception to this. Take on board these tips, please be mindful that for many people (particularly trans people) they may have been on a considerable social and emotional journey even to reach your venue or tennis activity and we want to ensure that their first experience is a positive one. You must therefore:
  • Welcome the player just as you would any other new attendee or member • Accept them in the gender they present; verification of their identity should be no more than expected of any other player.
  • Treat the individual with dignity and respect • Respect the private and confidential nature of the individual’s situation
  • Take your lead from the person attending your session, ask their name and use it
  • Ask them what they wish to do about changing facilities – see additional guidance below British Tennis Policy and Guidance on Trans Players Last updated: March 2017 Next Review: March 2019 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) Page 4 Policy and guidance on trans people playing tennis. • Encourage the individual to feedback any inappropriate language or behaviour from other members or spectators so that it can be dealt with • Agree with them how and what information is to be shared with others if this is absolutely necessary; this may include a change of name and title and this should be accommodated without prejudice or aggravation
  • Adopt a zero-tolerance stance to transphobic language or jokes whether or not the trans person is present. Language that degrades trans people creates a hostile environment and must be stopped. Sometimes these behaviours appear trivial and are overlooked. They must not be, because if allowed to continue, they become the norm, and behaviour and language, not only towards trans people, but towards other minority groups is also likely to escalate. Things to avoid
  • Please don’t make assumptions about the player, either in terms of their sexual orientation or their medical background, take your lead from the information they may, or may not, offer you
  • Don’t be uncomfortable or awkward in the language you use, the trans player should be referred to as the sex that they tell you are, i.e. use ‘he’ or ‘she’ as you would with anyone else. The use of changing/toilet facilities The use of changing and toilet facilities prior, to and during gender reassignment where the individual may present an ambiguous appearance and be highly selfconscious represents a difficult issue. Many trans people prefer to refrain from using communal sports facilities during this time, particularly facilities where privacy is likely to be an issue. In addition, there may be trans people who do not undergo sex reassignment surgery and will continue to present with secondary sex characteristics in their former gender. Trans members should have access to toilets and the changing room that corresponds to their gender identity.

You could provide unisex toilets as well as single changing cubicles in both the men’s and women’s changing areas. Complaints from other users must be handled carefully. It may be that other users find it uncomfortable to share facilities with trans people but it is the duty of venue officials to ensure that confidentiality is not compromised and that members are not subjected to abuse, whether physical or verbal, on any ground. However other users’ or members’ discomfort must not be ignored and they too should be treated with dignity, should their discomfort continue they may arrive ready changed for their tennis activity.

The provision of good quality facilities, an open and welcoming atmosphere and training for members may help alleviate such discomfort. My story (venue member): “As a trans woman, my biggest fear on joining the club was using the changing rooms. I was delighted to find they talked to me about what I needed and we were able to come up with a solution we were all happy with”. British Tennis Policy and Guidance on Trans Players Last updated: March 2017 Next Review: March 2019 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation) Page 5 Policy and guidance on trans people playing tennis. For More Information: Equality Network (promoting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equality & rights across Scotland) www.equality-network.org Gendered Intelligence (work with the trans community, particularly young trans people) www.genderedintelligence.co.uk GIRES (education and research on gender identity) www.gires.org.uk LEAP Sports Scotland (work for greater inclusion for LGBTI people in sport and against homophobia in sport) www.leapsports.org LGB&T Sport Cymru (promoting opportunities for LGB and T individuals in sport & physical activity in Wales) www.lgbtsport.cymru Pride Sports (sport development organisation for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people) www.pridesports.org.uk Stonewall (campaigns for the equality of lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans people across Britain) www.stonewall.org.uk British Tennis Policy and Guidance on Trans Players Last updated: March 2017 Next Review: March 2019 (or earlier if there is a change in legislation).

Whistle Blowing Policy

Last updated September 18 Next review September 19 IPSWICH SPORTS CLUB Safeguarding Whistle Blowing Policy Safeguarding children and adults at risk requires everyone to be committed to the highest possible standards of openness, integrity and accountability.

As a club, we are committed to encouraging and maintaining a culture where people feel able to raise a genuine safeguarding concern and are confident that it will be taken seriously.

What is whistle blowing? In the context of safeguarding, “whistle blowing” is when someone raises a concern about the well-being of a child or an adult at risk.

A whistle blower may be:

  • a player;
  • a volunteer;
  • a coach;
  • other member of staff;
  • an official;
  • a parent;
  • a member of the public. How to raise a concern about a child or an adult at risk at the Club If a child or an adult at risk is in immediate danger or risk of harm, the police should be contacted by calling 999. Where a child or an adult at risk is not in immediate danger, any concerns about their well-being should be made without delay to the Club Welfare Officer. The Club Welfare Officer will pass the details of the concern on to the LTA Safeguarding Team at the earliest opportunity and the relevant local authority and the police will be contacted, where appropriate. If, however, the whistle blower does not feel comfortable raising a concern with the Club Welfare Officer, the whistle blower should contact the LTA Safeguarding Team directly on 020 8487 7000, the Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) or the NSPCC on 0808 800 5000. Information to include when raising a concern The whistle blower should provide as much information as possible regarding the incident or circumstance which has given rise to the concern, including:
  • their name and contact details (unless they wish to remain anonymous);
  • names of individuals involved;  date, time and location of incident/circumstance; and  whether any witnesses were present. What happens next? All concerns raised by a whistle blower about the well-being of a child or an adult at risk will be taken seriously and every effort will be made to deal with each concern fairly, quickly and proportionately. If the whistle blower does not believe that the concern has been dealt with appropriately and wishes to speak to someone outside the club or the LTA Safeguarding Team, the NSPCC Whistleblowing advice line should be contacted on 0800 028 0285 or by emailing help@nspcc.org.uk. Support The club will not tolerate any harassment, victimisation or unfair treatment of, and will take appropriate action to protect, whistle blowers when they raise a concern.

Squash & Racketball Welfare

Safeguarding Policy

Updated & Reviewed 05.05.17 SAFEGUARDING ADULTS AT RISK POLICY & PROCEDURES (GUIDANCE FOR COUNTIES AND CLUBS) Updated & Reviewed 05.05.17 Introduction England Squash is committed to creating and maintaining a safe and positive environment and accepts our responsibility to safeguard the welfare of all adults involved in Squash in accordance with the Care Act 2014. England Squash Safeguarding Adults policy and procedures apply to all individuals involved in Squash at every level of the sport. England Squash will encourage County and club, partner organisations, including member National Governing Bodies, suppliers, sponsors and customers, to adopt and demonstrate their commitment to the principles and practice of equality as set out in this Safeguarding Policy.

Index: Introduction Principles

2 Safeguarding duties apply to an adult/Guidance and Legislation 

3 Definitions/Adults at Risk/Types of Abuse

4 Signs and Indicators of Abuse

5 What to do if you have a concern

6 How to Record a Disclosure/Flow Chart: Dealing with Concerns, Suspicions or Disclosure.

7 Appendices Roles and Responsibilities of those with England Squash

8 Good Practice/Poor Practice

9 Further Information

11 Updated & Reviewed 05.05.17 2.1 Principles 2.1 The guidance given in the policy and procedures is based on the following principles: 2.1.1 All adults, regardless of age, ability or disability, gender, race, religion, ethnic origin, sexual orientation, marital or transgender status have the right to be protected from abuse and poor practice and to participate in an enjoyable and safe environment. 2.1.2 England Squash will seek to ensure that our sport is inclusive and make reasonable adjustments for any ability, disability or impairment, we will also commit to continuous development, monitoring and review. 2.1.3 The rights, dignity and worth of all children and adults will always be respected. 2.1.4 We recognise that ability and disability can change over time, such that some adults may be additionally vulnerable to abuse, for example those who have a dependency on others or have different communication needs. 2.1.5 We recognise that a disabled adult may or may not identify themselves or be identified as an adult ‘at risk’. 2.1.6 We all have a shared responsibility to ensure the safety and well being of all adults and will act appropriately and report concerns whether these concerns arise within Squash e.g. inappropriate behaviour of a coach or outside e.g. in the wider community. 2.1.7 All allegations will be taken seriously and responded to quickly in line with England Squash Safeguarding Adults Policy and Procedures. 2.1.8 England Squash recognises the role and responsibilities of the statutory agencies in safeguarding adults and is committed to complying with the procedures of the Local Safeguarding Adults Boards. 2.1.9 England Squash Safeguarding Adults Policy and Procedures are mandatory.

Noting the remit of Squash and its jurisdiction, Squash encourages its County and Clubs Committees to adopt a similar policy. 2.2 Safeguarding duties apply to an adult who:

 Has needs for care and support (whether or not the local authority is meeting any of those needs) and;

 Is experiencing, or at risk of, abuse or neglect; and;  As a result of those care and support needs is unable to protect themselves from either the risk of, or the experience of, abuse or neglect 3 Guidance and Legislation 3.1 The practices and procedures within this policy are based on the principles contained within the UK and International legislation and Government Guidance Updated & Reviewed 05.05.17 and have been developed to complement the Safeguarding Adults Boards policy and procedures, and take the following into consideration:

 The Care Act 2014

 The Data Protection Act 1994 and 1998

 The Human Rights Act 1998

 The Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006

 The Equality Act 2010

 The Protection of Freedoms Act 2012

 Sexual Offences Act 2003

 Mental Capacity Act 2005

 Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims (Amendment) Act 2012 4 Definitions

4.1 To assist working through and understanding this Policy a number of key definitions need to be explained:

4.1.1 Adult or Vulnerable Adult or Adult at Risk? In recent years there has been a change from using the term ‘vulnerable’ to describe adults potentially at risk from harm or abuse. Vulnerable is believed to be a disempowering term. To describe the adults that we are referring to in this document, we will use the definition from the Care Act 2014 Adults at Risk

 The Care Act (2014) definition replaced the ‘No Secrets (2000) definition of ‘Vulnerable Adult’

 Explicitly applies to those aged over 18 even if they may be receiving what may be thought of as a “children” or “young people’s” service

 Has care and support needs

 Includes carers

4.1.2 Abuse is a violation of an individual’s human and civil rights by another person or persons. See section 5 for further explanations.

4.1.3 Adult is anyone aged 18 or over.

4.1.4 At risk is a term which has become broadly accepted to mean that someone may be more vulnerable to abuse than someone else. For example an adult with a learning disability may well be more at risk of financial abuse as they may struggle with managing their finances, or understanding of the use of technologies this could leave them at risk from an unscrupulous person.

4.1.5 Capacity refers to the ability to make a decision at a particular time, for example when under considerable stress. The starting assumption must always be that a person has the capacity to make a decision unless it can be established that they lack capacity (MCA 2006).

5 Types of Abuse

5.1 Self-neglect – this covers a wide range of behaviour: neglecting to care for one’s personal hygiene, health or surroundings and includes behaviour such Updated & Reviewed 05.05.17 as hoarding. In Squash this could be a player whose appearance becomes unkempt, does not wear suitable sports kit and who is starting to smell.

5.2 Modern Slavery – encompasses slavery, human trafficking, forced labour and domestic servitude. Traffickers and slave masters use whatever means they have at their disposal to coerce, deceive and force individuals into a life of abuse, servitude and inhumane treatment.

In Squash you may notice that a participant in a team has been missing from practice sessions and is not responding to reminders from team members or coaches. 5.3 Domestic Abuse – including psychological, physical, sexual, financial, emotional abuse. Sport may notice a power imbalance between a participant and a family member. For example a participant with Downs syndrome may be looking quiet and withdrawn when someone different comes to collect them from sessions, in contrast to their personal assistant whom they greet with a smile.

5.4 Discriminatory – discrimination is abuse which centres on a difference or perceived difference particularly with respect to race, gender or disability or any of the protected characteristics of the Equality Act. In Squash setting this could be the harassing of an individual because they are or are perceived to be transgender.

5.6 Organisational Abuse – including neglect and poor care practice within an institution or specific care setting such as a hospital or care home, for example, or in relation to care provided in one’s own home. This may range from one off incidents to on-going ill-treatment. It can be through neglect or poor professional practice because of the structure, policies, processes and practices within an organisation. In a (insert name of your sport), this could be training without a necessary break.

5.7 Physical Abuse – includes hitting, slapping, pushing, kicking, misuse of medication, restraint or inappropriate sanctions. This could be a coach or other member of the club intentionally striking an athlete.

5.8 Sexual Abuse – including rape, indecent exposure, sexual harassment, inappropriate looking or touching, sexual teasing or innuendo, sexual photography, subjection to pornography or witnessing sexual acts, indecent exposure and sexual assault or sexual acts to which the adult has not consented or was pressured into consenting. In squash, this could be a fellow athlete who sends sexually explicit text messages to an adult they are training alongside.

5.9 Financial or Material Abuse – including theft, fraud, internet scamming, coercion in relation to an adult’s financial affairs or arrangements, including in connection with wills, property, inheritance or financial transactions, or the misuse or misappropriation of property, possessions or benefits. In Squash, this could be someone taking equipment from another athlete.

5.10 Neglect – including ignoring medical or physical care needs, failure to provide access to appropriate health social care or educational services, the Updated & Reviewed 05.05.17 withholding of the necessities of life, such as medication, adequate nutrition and heating. In squash, this could be a coach not ensuring athletes have access to water.

5.11 Emotional or Psychological Abuse – this includes threats of harm or abandonment, deprivation of contact, humiliation, blaming, controlling, intimidation, coercion, harassment, verbal abuse, isolation or withdrawal from services or supportive networks. In a squash, this could be an athlete threatening another athlete with physical harm and persistently blaming them for poor performance.

5.12 Cyber Bullying – cyberbullying occurs when someone repeatedly makes fun of another person online or repeatedly picks on another person through emails or text messages, or uses online forums with the intention of harming, damaging, humiliating or isolating another person. It can be used to carry out many different types of bullying (such as racist bullying, homophobic bullying, or bullying related to special educational needs and disabilities) but instead of the perpetrator carrying out the bullying face-to-face, they use technology as a means to do it. See section 12.

6 Signs and Indicators of Abuse

6.1 Abuse can take place in any context and by all manner of perpetrator. In squash abuse may be inflicted by anyone in the club that an athlete comes into contact with. Or club members, workers, volunteers or coaches may suspect that an athlete is being abused outside of the club setting. There are many signs and indicators that may suggest someone is being abused, these include but are not limited to:

6.1.1 Unexplained bruises or injuries – or lack of medical attention when an injury is present.

6.1.2 Person has belongings or money going missing 6.1.3 Person is not attending / no longer enjoying their sessions 6.1.4 Someone losing or gaining weight / an unkempt appearance

6.1.5 A change in the behaviour or confidence of a person.

6.1.6 They may self-harm.

6.1.7 They may have a fear of a particular group or individual 6.1.8 They may tell you / another person they are being abused – i.e. a disclosure.

7. What to do if you have a concern or someone raises concerns with you.

7.1 You may become aware that abuse or poor practice is taking place, suspect abuse or poor practice may be occurring or be told about something that may be abuse or poor practice and you must report this to the County/Club Squash Welfare Officer (WO), or, England Squash Welfare Officer, National.

7.2. If you are at an international event and have a concern then speak to the coach or a team official. Updated & Reviewed 05.05.17 7.3 If you are concerned someone is in immediate danger contact the police. 7.4 It is important when considering your concern that you also consider the needs and wishes of the person at risk, taking into account the nature of the alert, more information on the Legislative Framework:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data /file/592101/Working_Together_to_Safeguard_Children_20170213.pdf. Information sharing for community safety:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data /file/97842/guidance.pdf

8. How to Record a Disclosure

8.1 Make a note of what the person has said using his or her own words as soon as practicable and complete an Incident Form, submit to the Squash welfare officer. A form can be located on Squash website.

8.2 Describe the circumstances in which the disclosure came about.

8.3 Take care to distinguish between fact, observation, allegation and opinion. It is important that the information you have is accurate.

8.4 Be mindful of the need to be confidential at all times, this information must only be shared with your WO or their substitute and others on a need to know basis.

 Consent must be obtained from the person affected

 Information can also be shared without consent where the ‘vital interests’ of the individual are affected (and he or she cannot give consent or consent cannot reasonably be obtained); or where there is a legal duty.

 Liaise with the family/carers, providing they are not implicated and the person consents

8.5 Share your concern verbally or in writing with the Welfare Officer or their substitute.

8.6 If the matter is urgent and relates to the immediate safety of an adult at risk then contact the police immediately. Updated & Reviewed 05.05.17 Safeguarding Adults Flowchart 1 Dealing with Concerns, Suspicions or Disclosure Are there concerns/suspicions about a person’s behaviour? OR Has there been disclosure or an allegation about a person’s behaviour? Yes Is the concern about adult abuse? Yes Investigated by WO with the support of the Steering Group

 Call ambulance

 Tell doctor that there may be a safeguarding issue

 Inform Gayle Pink WO Does the person need medical attention? Is a WO implicated? Is the concern about poor practice? Yes No Outcomes:

 No further action

 Steering Group to decide on the management of any remaining concerns

 England Squash disciplinary measures Referral to Police/Adult Social Care/ LSAB Outcomes:

 Police enquiry

 Criminal proceedings If Squash WO – Inform BS CEO or BS Deputy WO. Make notes and complete Incident Report Form, submit to BS CEO or BS Deputy SWO If NGB WO – Dealt with by:

 England Squash WO

 other designated person Inform England Squash WO. Make notes and complete Incident Report Form, submit to Gayle Pink WO No Inform SO. Make notes and complete Incident Report Form, submit to WO Yes Updated & Reviewed 05.05.17

9. Roles and Responsibilities of those within England Squash

9.1 England Squash is committed to having the following in place:

9.1.1 A Welfare Officer to produce and disseminate guidance and resources to support the Policy and procedures.

9.1.2 A clear line of accountability within the organisation for work on promoting the welfare of all adults.

9.1.3 Procedures for dealing with allegations of abuse or poor practice against members of staff and volunteers.

9.1.4 A Case Management Group that effectively deals with issues, manages concerns and refers to a disciplinary panel where necessary (i.e. where concerns arise about the behaviour of someone within Squash

9.1.5 A Disciplinary Panel will be formed as required for a given incident.

9.1.6 Arrangements in place to work effectively with other organisations to safeguard and promote the welfare of adults, including arrangements for sharing information.

9.1.7 Appropriate whistle blowing procedures and an open and inclusive culture that enables safeguarding and equality and diversity issues to be addressed.

10. Good Practice, Poor Practice and Abuse Introduction It can be difficult to distinguish poor practice from abuse, whether intentional or accidental. It is not the responsibility of any individual involved in Squash to make judgements regarding whether or not abuse is taking place, however, all Squash personnel have the responsibility to recognise and identify poor practice and potential abuse, and act on this if they have concerns.

10.1 Good practice England Squash strongly advises that coaches of adult athletes:

  • Fully accept Squash Coaches Codes of Conduct.
  • Have completed a course in basic awareness in working with Adults at Risk. Everyone should:
  • Aim to make the experience of Squash fun and enjoyable.
  • Promote fairness and playing by the rules.
  • Not tolerate the use of prohibited or illegal substances.
  • Treat all adults at risk equally and preserve their dignity; this includes giving more and less talented members of a group similar attention, time and respect. Updated & Reviewed 05.05.17 Coaches and those working directly with adults at risk should:
  • Respect the developmental stage of each athlete and not risk sacrificing their welfare in a desire for team or personal achievement.
  • Ensure that the training intensity is appropriate to the physical, social and emotional stage of the development of the athlete.
  • Work with adults at risk, medical adviser and their carers (where appropriate) to develop realistic training and competition schedules which are suited to the needs and lifestyle of the athlete, not the ambitions of others such as coaches, team members, parents or carers.
  • Build relationships based on mutual trust and respect, encouraging adults at risk to take responsibility for their own development and decisionmaking
  • Always be publicly open when working with adults at risk: – avoid coaching sessions or meetings where a coach and an individual athlete are completely unobserved.
  • Maintain an appropriate and open environment.  Avoid unnecessary physical contact with people. Physical contact (touching) can be appropriate so long as: – it is neither intrusive nor disturbing – the athlete’s permission has been openly given – it is delivered in an open environment -coach specific to the direction of improvement of technique
  • Maintain a safe and appropriate relationship with athletes and avoid forming intimate relationships with athletes you are working with as this may threaten the position of trust and respect present between athlete and coach.
  • Be an excellent role model by maintaining appropriate standards of behaviour.
  • Gain the adult at risk consent and, where appropriate, the consent of relevant carers, in writing, to administer emergency first aid or other medical treatment if the need arises.
  • Be aware of medical conditions, disabilities, existing injuries and medicines being taken and keep written records of any injury or accident that occurs, together with details of treatments provided.
  • Arrange that someone with current knowledge of emergency first aid is available at all times.
  • Gain written consent from the correct people and fill out relevant checklists and information forms for travel arrangements and trips. This should be the adult themselves if they have capacity to do so.

10.2 Poor practice The following are regarded as poor practice and should be avoided:

  • Unnecessarily spending excessive amounts of time alone with an individual adult Updated & Reviewed 05.05.17
  • Engaging in rough, physical or sexually provocative games, including horseplay.
  • Allowing or engaging in inappropriate touching of any form.
  • Using language that might be regarded as inappropriate by the adult and which may be hurtful or disrespectful.
  • Making sexually suggestive comments, even in jest.
  • Reducing an adult to tears as a form of control.
  • Letting allegations made by an adult go uninvestigated, unrecorded, or not acted upon.
  • Taking an adult at risk alone in a car on journeys, however short.
  • Inviting or taking an adult at risk to your home or office where they will be alone with you.
  • Sharing a room with an adult at risk.
  • Doing things of a personal nature that adults at risk can do for themselves Note: At times it may be acceptable to do some of the above. In these cases, to protect both the adult at risk and yourself, seek written consent from the adult at risk and, where appropriate, their carers and ensure that the WO of your organisation is aware of the situation and gives their approval. If, during your care, you accidentally injure an adult at risk, they seem distressed in any manner, appear to be sexually aroused by your actions, or misunderstand/misinterpret something you have done, report these incidents as soon as possible to another adult in the organisation and make a brief written note of it.

11. Other relevant policies

  • Whistle Blowing
  • Social media
  • Complaints
  • Disciplinary 12 Further Information Policies, procedures and supporting information are available on the England Squash website: www.englandsquash.com Welfare Officer local: Welfare Officer National: Mark Williams (mark.williams@englandsquash.com) Review date This policy will be reviewed every year or sooner in the event of legislative changes or revised policies and best practice. Updated & Reviewed 05.05.17 Appendix 1 – Incident Referral Form Appendix 2 – Contacts Form.
 
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